Why Your Dog Smells “Doggy”

dog smell

Ask a veterinarian what is one of the best smells in the world and many will answer without a moment’s hesitation: puppy breath. Hardly anyone can resist the fresh scent of a new puppy, kind of like the smell of a new car. But, as your dog grows up, he loses that delightful smell and sometimes can smell, well, a bit like a dog. Doggy smells may indicate a problem needing more than just a dog deodorant. Consider the following problems if you whiff the dog smell.

Hound Halitosis
While your dog is always kissable, a bad case of hound halitosis may make you want to avoid a smooch from your pooch. Doggy breath is not normal and is a sign of tooth or gum disease. Daily brushing and special dental products can help. But your dog may need a professional cleaning to eliminate the smell. Keep in mind, bad breath has been included as one of the 10 warning signs of pet cancer. A serious case of bad breath should send you and your dog to the veterinarian’s office pronto.

Stinky Ears
First you notice your dog scratching at his head and then you catch a stench wafting from his ears. Ear infections are one of the most common reasons dogs see their veterinarian and frequently are associated with a bad smell. Flip up the ear flap. If your dog winches, has a red flap or gook coming from the ear canal, you may be dealing with an ear infection as the source of the unpleasant doggy smell. Both bacteria and yeast can be at the root of stinky ears. Your veterinarian can do testing to identify the culprit and prescribe the appropriate medication.

Reeking Rumps
The anal sacs sit on the right and left sides between the layers of muscles making up the anal sphincter. Each one has a duct traveling out from the sac to the skin. Why dogs (and cats too) have this anatomic structure is somewhat of a mystery. Why about 10% of dogs have recurrent impactions and infections of the anal glands is also a mystery. There is no question however, that the smell of anal sac secretions can clear out large areas of a veterinary clinic and send the assistants running for room deodorizer. When your dog slides his rump on the floor or licks that area excessively, he may be trying to telling you he has an anal gland problem.

If your Fido is a bit fragrant don’t worry, a trip to veterinarian can have him smelling as fresh as a bunch of daisies.

Dental DOs and DON’Ts

Because February is National Pet Dental Health Month, I spoke to all three of The AMC’s veterinary dentists to get a list of dental DOs and DON’Ts for my readers. A big shout-out to Drs. Dan Carmichael, Django Martel and Stephen Riback for their help in compiling this list.

Dental DON’Ts – Bones, doggie breath and furry tennis balls
Our three dentists spend much of their time repairing fractured teeth. They blame hard nylon “bones” as a major cause of fractured teeth in dogs. According to Dr. Riback, “Any bone you think might break your tooth if you bit down on it is not one you should give to your dog.”

Don’t tolerate doggie breath in your dog (or cat). Bad breath in your Bassett, Bichon or Burmese is not normal and is very likely a sign of periodontal disease. Stinky breath in your pet means it’s time to schedule a dental cleaning with your pet’s veterinarian.

Although tennis balls are on your dog’s DO list, the tennis ball fur is very abrasive to teeth, making furry tennis balls a DON’T in the mind of veterinary dentists.

Dental DOs – Toothbrushing, VOHC, dental cleaning with anesthesia
Topping the list of dental DOs is daily toothbrushing for your dog and cat. If your pet won’t tolerate brushing, you can use special dental wipes to clean the teeth. DO select oral hygiene products like toothpaste, tartar reducing diets and treats based on the products recommended by the Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC).

DO choose tartar control products and dental wipes containing hexametaphosphate, a product that research has shown to decrease tartar buildup on teeth.

The final DO is to make a call now for an appointment to see your pet’s veterinarian to discuss a complete dental cleaning while your pet is under general anesthesia.

Veterinary Dental Resources

Follow @amcny on Twitter to be a part of our National Pet Dental Health Month #TweetTooth campaign to promote healthy pet dental hygiene!